Fair Housing in California - June 2, 2019

Fair Housing in California - June 2, 2019

A discussion panel examining AB 686 and its effects on housing in California.

housing solutions panel

Housing crisis: Solutions on the horizon? 

California’s New Fair Housing Law: What Does it Mean for Marin?

 New  law requires every California city and county to identify and address disparities in housing and access to opportunities. How much will these new laws and rules affect local control? Will it change our local zoning? What happens if the law isn't followed?

On Sunday, June 2, 2:30 PM a panel of distinguished experts will present information on the implementation of this new law and discuss potential implications for every jurisdiction in California and most importantly Marin's towns and cities.

Speaking will be Megan Kirkeby, Assistant Deputy Director for Fair Housing of the State Department of Housing and Community Development, Jessica Trounstine, Associate Professor at the University of California, Merced, and Alicia Klein, Associate Director of Housing Development at Resources for Community Development (RCD). Cesar Lagleva, United Marin Rising, will moderate the discussion and there will be time for interaction with the audience. 

Simultaneous translation into Spanish will be available. 

The event will be at the San Rafael Community Center, 618 B Street from 2:30 to 5:00 pm. There is no charge for admission but registration is requested in order to plan. Light refreshments will be available.

Fair housing requirementshave been enforced under the federal Fair Housing Act (Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968).  In 2015, the federal government issued updated and stronger regulations for jurisdictions accessing certain federal funds, requiringrecipients to affirmatively further fair housing including an Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH) every five years. Although the Trump administration withdrew the AFH regulations, the California legislature passed AB 686 the 2015 federal AFH regulations into AB 686.

Much of AB 686 became effective on January 1, 2019. The rest will become effective as the next round of Housing Elements are prepared by the cities and counties in California. Never before has each jurisdiction in California, including the Public Housing Authorities, been subject to state requirements for affirmatively furthering fair housing. 

According to the new law,

“Affirmatively furthering fair housing” means taking meaningful actions, in addition to combating discrimination, that overcome patterns of segregation and foster inclusive communities free from barriers that restrict access to opportunity based on protected characteristics. Specifically, affirmatively furthering fair housing means taking meaningful actions that, taken together, address significant disparities in housing needs and in access to opportunity, replacing segregated living patterns with truly integrated and balanced living patterns, transforming racially and ethnically concentrated areas of poverty into areas of opportunity, and fostering and maintaining compliance with civil rights and fair housing laws. The duty to affirmatively further fair housing extends to all of a public agency’s activities and programs relating to housing and community development."

Supported by the Marin Community Foundation, Community Action Marin, the Marin Chapter of the ACLU of Northern California, and Marin Housing Solutions, admission to this event is free.

Register at Eventbrite under Fair Housing in California AB 686 Impacts of Cities & Counties (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fair-housing-in-california-ab-686-impacts-on-cities-counties-tickets-60673771885)

For further details, please contact Chandra Alexandre, CEO, Community Action Marin - Phone: 415-526-7500

 

Download PDF flier, click here or on the image

fair housing 686 eng

Download PDF Flier, click here or on the image

housing solutions dave

The Fair Housing Act, passed by Congress and Signed by Lyndon Johnson shortly after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., provides broad protection from discrimination in housing. By recognizing in part that the government previously sanctioned and promoted segregation by Federal and State and local governments (See the Color of Law by Richard Rothstein), Lyndon Johnson’s New Society was an effort, in part, to identify and overcome impediments to fair housing.

In 1968 Richard Nixon appointed George Romney, a successful industrialist and former governor of Michigan (and father of Mitt Romney) as HUD’s first secretary. Romney was governor of Michigan during the race riots of 1967 which included Detroit. The Kerner Commission which studied the causes of the riots found that "Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white—separate and unequal." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerner_Commission). George Romney took the call to improve race relations seriously and was often thwarted by Nixon.

As part of Nixon’s New Federalism, Federal Aid was turned from subsidies controlled by Washington DC into block grants over which localities had greater control. However, in exchange, the Federal Government required that periodic evaluations of the uses and effectiveness of these funds be submitted.